Tutte le foto (4)Palazzo Golestan
Palazzo Golestan
Palazzo Golestan

Palazzo Golestan

8,915 recensioni
Luoghi d'interesse e musei, Museo di storia
Classificata #6 in Teheran Cose da fare
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Tehran District 12 Fifth Khordad Avenue, Arg Sqr، Panzdah-e-Khordad St, Iran
+98 21 3311 3335
http://www.golestanpalace.ir/
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Abitante di Teheran

Il Palazzo Golestan (Persiano: کاخ گلستان - KAX e Golestan), letteralmente il Palazzo Roseland, è l'ex complesso Qajar reale nella capitale dell'Iran, Teheran. Il più antico dei monumenti storici a Teheran, e dello stato di patrimonio mondiale, il Palazzo Golestan appartiene ad un gruppo di edifici reali che una volta erano racchiuso entro le mura di fango-paglia su di Teheran storico Arg (cittadella). E 'un capolavoro di bellissimo giardino e gli edifici costituiti da collezione di arte artigianale iraniani e regali europei dal 18 ° e 19 ° secolo.

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Londra

Il sontuoso 'Rose Garden Palace' è il più antico monumento storico a Teheran, un capolavoro della gloriosa ricchezza della dinastia Qajar e Unesco World Heritage Site. All'interno, il rivoluzionario giardino di influenza europea è fiancheggiata da squisita collezione di palazzi reali, sale e musei, carichi di antichità persiane. Il 'Takht e-Marmar' è il famoso trono di marmo, mostrando il meglio dell'architettura iraniana, rimanendo una fonte di ispirazione per gli artisti iraniani e architetti a questo giorno. Questa terrazza ha tenuto incoronazioni e cerimonie di corte.

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Contea di New York

Anche se elaborato Golestan Palace è stato originariamente costruito nel 15 ° secolo, è stata la famiglia regnante Qajar che ne fece la sede del governo circa 300 anni più tardi, aggiungendo i suoi tratti più caratteristici. Ciò che resta del palazzo complesso il più antico monumento di Teheran-è composto da otto palazzi principali rigogliosi giardini circostanti. Reza Shah ha distrutto gran parte di essa tra il 1925 e il 1945 per fare spazio a grandi, 1950-era edifici commerciali.

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Abitante di Teheran
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pronunciato "Kakheh Golestan" è l'ex complesso Qajar reale nella capitale iraniana. Il più antico dei monumenti storici di Teheran, un patrimonio mondiale, il Palazzo Golestan (anche Gulistan Palace) (The Rose Garden Palace) appartiene ad un gruppo di edifici reali che una volta erano racchiuso entro le mura di fango-paglia su di Teheran storico Arg (cittadella ).

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la ricca cultura

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Golestan Palace

The glories and excesses of the Qajar rulers are played out across this complex of grand buildings decorated with beautifully painted tiles and set around an elegant garden that’s worth visiting in its own right. There are separate tickets for nine different sections, which you need to buy at the gate: the ones worth paying extra for are the Main Halls, which includes the spectacular Mirror Hall, and the Negar Khaneh (Iranian Painting Gallery).

Although there was a Safavid-era citadel on this site, it was Nasser al-Din Shah (r 1848–96), impressed by what he’d seen of European palaces, who created the ‘Palace of Flowers’ you see today. Originally it was much bigger, with inner and outer sections to encompass offices, ministries and private living quarters, but several surrounding buildings were pulled down under the Pahlavis.

Takht-e Marmar

Heading in a clockwise direction around the courtyard from the ticket office, along reflecting pool to leads to the Takht-e Marmar (Marble Throne Verandah), a mirrored, open-fronted audience hall dominated by a magnificent throne. Made in the early 1800s for Fath Ali Shah (r 1797–1834), the throne is constructed from alabaster mined in Yazd and supported by carved human figures. This hall was used on ceremonial occasions, including the Napoleon-style self-coronation of Reza Shah in 1925.

Khalvate-e Karim Khani

On the corner of the same building is the gorgeous Khalvate-e Karim Khani (Karim Khan Nook), all that remains of a 1759 structure that served as the Tehran residence of Karim Khan Zand (r 1751–79). But it was Nasser al-Din Shah who enjoyed this elevated terrace most, smoking qalyan (water pipe) and perhaps contemplating his next asset sale as qanat(underground channel) water bubbled out of the marble fountain nearby. His marble tombstone now stands on the terrace.

Negar Khaneh

Next is the Negar Khaneh (Iranian Painting Gallery), which displays a fine collection of Qajar-era art. Especially interesting are the portraits of the shahs wearing the jewels and crowns you can see in the National Jewels Museum, and pictures of everyday life in 19th-century Iran.

Royal Museum

The next set of rooms comprises the Royal Museum (also called the Special Museum), a fascinating treasure trove of decorative art pieces and objects amassed by the shahs.

Main Halls

The palace’s highlight is the Main Halls, including the dazzling Talar-e Ayaheh (Mirror Hall). Built between 1874 and 1877 the Peacock Throne was housed here before it was moved to the National Jewels Museum. It was used for the coronation of Mohammad Reza Shah in 1967 (25 years after he came to power) and royal weddings. Today it and two adjoining halls house gifts, including a set of green malachite table decorations from Russia and fine porcelain from France, Germany, and the UK.

Howze Khaneh

Further east is the Howze Khaneh (Pool Room), named for the small pool and fountain in its center. It houses a collection of paintings and sculptures of 19th-century European royalty given to their Qajar counterparts by the same European monarchs.

Talar-e Berelian

Next door is the aptly named Talar-e Berelian (Brilliant Hall), where the use of mirrored glass on all surfaces and twinkling chandeliers reaches its apogee.

Shams-Al Emarat

At the east end of the garden, the imposing Shams-Al Emarat (Edifice of the Sun) blends European and Persian architectural traditions. Born of Nasser al-Din Shah’s desire to have a palace that afforded him a panoramic view of the city, it was designed by master architect Moayer al-Mamalek and built between 1865 and 1867. The only part of the building’s ground floor is open for view, showcasing yet another sequence of mirrored and tiled rooms.

Emarat-e Badgir

Next door stands four soaring badgirs (wind towers; used to catch breezes and funnel them down into a building to cool it), rising above the restored Emarat-e Badgir, first erected in the reign of Fath Ali Shah. The interior has typically ostentatious mirror work and is worth a quick look.

Aks Khaneh

In the basement, the Aks Khaneh (Historic Photograph Gallery) exhibits a fascinating collection of historic photographs; one picture shows the inside of a Zoroastrian tower of silence, with bodies in varying states of decay.

Talar-e Almas

Next up, the small Talar-e Almas (Diamond Hall) offers more blinged-to-the-max decoration. The more subdued teahouse and restaurant underneath might well be more appealing.

Abyaz Palace

Finally, back near the entrance, the Abyaz Palace houses the Ethnographical Museum featuring a range of mannequins in traditional ethnic costumes.

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Kīsh

This place shows an iranian culture and history
It was a very good experience
I do really recommend it

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Kuala Lumpur

Golestan Palace or Rose Palace (Gol means rose in Persian) is the oldest historic monument in Tehran, consisting of royal buildings in an ancient citadel, and was formerly official residence of the royal Qajar family from the late 18th century till the early 20th century. Until the Islamic Revolution in 1979, Golestan was used for formal royal receptions and coronations only. Some of the attractions in the palace are the Marble Throne, the Hall of Brilliance and the Reception Hall.

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Minneapolis
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Abitante di Teheran
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Abitante di Teheran
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Palazzo Golestan

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